Imaging Laboratory

The Imaging Laboratory of the Jagiellonian Center of Innovation offers a broad range of services within the scope of surface analysis based mainly on Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy.

 

Raman (effect) spectroscopy

 

Raman spectroscopy is one of the most universal analytical techniques that allow for determination of the chemical composition of the analyzed material. It is based on the phenomenon of non-elastic scattering of monochromatic light. The energy of the non-elastically scattered light is different from the energy of incident light. The recorded energy change can be presented as a Raman spectrum characteristic of a given substance.

 

The laboratory is equipped with a high quality Raman spectroscope (WITec alpha300 RSA+) with EMCCD detector, optical profilometer and two laser lines with wavelengths of 532 nm and 785 nm. The device is coupled with a confocal microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). All measurements are performed on the same table, without the necessity to transfer the sample. The measurements do not require previous labeling and are non-destructive for the materials.

 

We offer:

 

  • Determination of chemical composition of the tested material by comparison with spectra of reference substances
  • Measurements within the scope of imaging of various substance distribution in tablets (spatial resolution up to 200–300 nm)
  • Analysis of solid formulation homogeneity
  • Analysis of sample topography and confocal measurements
  • Measurements of chemical substances allowing for differentiation of various polymorphic forms
  • Analysis of the range of permeability of semi-liquid formulations, depending on the time and conditions of exposition
  • Analysis of permeability of substances through layers of skin and hair

Additionally, the Raman spectrometer may be used for:

  • Analysis of chosen tissue fragments
  • In vitro cell analysis, with a possibility to differentiate the cellular organelles
  • Chemical imaging without histological dying
  • Analysis of structure and quality of the tested material, e.g. determination of the internal structure (distribution of matrix substances) or quality tests of the shell e.g. of a microcapsule
  • Assessment of smoothness and homogeneity of the surface and degree and quality of the product coating
  • Medical substance testing for active substance analysis, determination of the degree of crystallization, the appearance of the crystal walls and presence of defects such as grooves or cracks.
  • Determination of active substance distribution in the analyzed product and imaging its homogeneity
  • Determination of solid body contamination
  • Characteristics of components of paint layers (pigments, fillers, adhesives)
Scanning electron microscopy

 

Scanning electron microscopy allows for testing conductive materials (metals and alloys) and non-conductive samples such as ceramics, polymers, composite and organic materials.

 

The laboratory is equipped with a scanning electron microscope (Mira3-FEG-SEM, Tescan) with field emission (Schottky’s emitter), with a spectrometer of X-ray energy dispersion (EDX) (Oxford Instruments) and a cooling stage (Peltier) with a working temperature range from -30°C. The microscope allows high-, low- and varying vacuum working mode.

 

We offer:

  • Imaging of conductive and non-conductive samples in high and low vacuum
  • Analysis of morphology and elemental composition of a wide variety of conducting and non-conducting samples (at high and low vacuum)
  • Quantitative or semi-quantitative analysis (depending on the analyzed element) of elements with atomic number Z>=5. Point, surface, linear analysis and mapping modes available
  • Observation of dynamic changes in the samples like phase trasitions (using heating and cooling options of the Peltier sample stage) as well as dehydration effects on the sample morphology

Head of the Imaging Laboratory 
Emilia Staniszewska-Ślęzak, PhD

 

Emilia Staniszewska-Ślęzak, PhD, graduated from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Jagiellonian University. For over 7 years, she has been interested in Raman and absorption spectroscopy in the infrared range. A co-author of many scientific publications showing the application of the above-mentioned techniques in biomedical and art conservation research. She has been connected with the Jagiellonian Center of Innovation since 2017 and she is responsible for performing research with use of Raman spectroscopy.

 

For a quote, please contact:

Telephone: +48 12 297 46 12

Mobile: +48 512 785 197
E-mail: agata.mleczkowska@jci.pl

Our clients

Application notes

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